Spotlight on vintage fashion brands: Gunne Sax

If you’re a lover of vintage fashion, especially 1970’s fashion, then you have probably heard of Gunne Sax dresses. Known for being romantic, often with medieval and renaissance inspired designs, Gunne Sax, a clothing label owned by Jessica McClintock, is commonly associated with the ‘prairie dresses’ trend.

For the uninitiated prairie dresses are a trend that was originally popular in the 1970’s (their original roots however are in rural 19th century America) and are often characterised as (usually) long, flowing dresses, often incorporating high necklines, lace and florals and often inspired historically by the Victorian and Edwardian periods of fashion. They recently were revived in 2017/2018 due to the popularity of modern designers like Batsheva and the Vampire’s Wife but there was glimmers of the popularity that was to come in the earlier 2000’s. For example prairie dresses are referenced in the Netflix show Girlboss (set around 2008), as Britt Robertson, acting as Nasty Gal‘s original owner Sophia Amorusa, discusses the trend (if I remember correctly she predicts that prairie dresses will be in, which ends up being a misstep).

Prairie dresses therefore are often associated with a more traditionally feminised way of dressing and because of their reference to the past, fairytale way of dressing. When I put on a prairie dress I often feel like I could be a character in a fairytale myself, perhaps it’s the flowing skirts that make me instantly think of a Austen heroine hiking through a field to visit their sick sister against the conventional norms of their time, whatever it is Gunne Sax dresses definitely fit that brief for me!

I’m not surprised that the dresses were popular as wedding dresses, and in fact Hillary Rodham famously wore a Gunne Sax dress when she married Bill Clinton. According to this article, she bought her dress from the local mall for $53 dollars the night before the wedding!

For many Gunne Sax, was at its peak during the 1970s, which was the height of the maxi, flowing dress trend and are often associated with the British equivalent, Laura Ashley (who I will cover in another post because I am a big fan!). Fans of the brand often talk of the rare black label dresses, which indicate that the dress is one of the very first of Jessica McClintock’s designs.

There have been numerous copies of Gunne Sax dresses however, as one issue with the dresses is their limited size range. The large sizes are often coveted because the maximum size the dresses go up to is 31 inches on the waist, which is about equivalent to about a UK size 12-14. You can find a handy reference to what size Gunne Sax dresses usually equate to here.

Dress: Vintage Gunne Sax (unfortunately with the inside tag mostly ripped off, as well as the size tag). I think the seller unfortunately mis-measured this, as after measuring it myself I got different measurements than the one listed but I luckily squeezed into it.

Bow: Henriette Von Grünberg (I emailed to check and Henriette sources her silks from left over silks from bigger brands in the season).

Nowadays, I have definitely noticed a revival for the dresses, especially on Instagram with hashtag #gunnesax, #gunnesaxdress and #gunnesaxobsessed getting a lot of love and there are whole vintage accounts dedicated to appreciating and selling the dresses, so I reached out to some of my favourites to see if they could give some more insight into why people love and collect ‘Gunnes’ as they’re often lovingly dubbed.

One of my favourite Gunne Sax Instagram accounts is @babygypsyeyes run by the lovely Samantha, who kindly answered some of my questions about all things Gunne Sax, revealing that she has a collection of over 100 dresses (I can only dream of such an achievement!) and that she wears Gunne Sax dresses almost everyday.

First, I asked what it is about Gunne Sax that draws her in – if you wear Gunne Sax almost every day there must be a reason!

“For me, Gunne Sax is an imperative piece in the prairie puzzle I have in my head.  Let me explain, I grew up watching ‘Little House on the Prairie’ re-runs.  I remember being quite young and really relating to that old frontier lifestyle of simpler times and full ruffled calico dresses.  Decades later I am living my dream life on a 150 acre farm that is truly in the middle of nowhere.  I named my son ‘Wilder’ (Laura Ingalls Wilder is the author of ‘Little House on the prairie).  I wear Gunne Sax dresses nearly everyday and have put together a collection of over 100 dresses that I am very proud of.  We are living a clean life that is far removed from anything urban!  We grow vegetables, have animals and some days we don’t see a single vehicle go down our road.  Gunne Sax feels like home and fits into this simple life we are living.  A life that is innocent, safe and clean in a world that can be very frightening.”

@babygypsyeyes
Image credit: @babygypsyeyes

I was also keen to get into the ‘nitty-gritty’ of why Samantha thinks Gunne Sax dresses continue to appeal and she mentioned how even in the 1970s the dresses, “were expensive and desirable” and when you think about it $53 dollars in the 1970s would have been an expensive dress! She also highlighted how Gunne Sax dresses are on trend right now.

“They are high quality and expressive, the number of Gunne Sax designs is ASTOUNDING.  This makes them fun to collect.”

@babygypsyeyes
Image credit: @babygypsyeyes

Samantha also revealed to me a group on Facebook, which I am definitely going to go join, called ‘Gunne Sax Addicts’ , which she describes as a, “community of lovely people who all have one thing in common, a love for the label”.

“Many people who encounter Gunne Sax quickly become passionate collectors.  But what is it about these dresses?  Many of the designs hearken to history, Renaissance & Medieval, Edwardian and Victorian, Hippies & Gypsies.  Musicians make IG posts wearing these dresses, ‘The Love Witch’ wears several Gunne Sax during the course of the film.  They are flattering to wear, romantic and feminine, they stir emotions and can help a gal fill any of a number of fantasy roles!  And like I said, with so many designs there is likely a Gunne Sax for everyone out there!”

@babygypsyeyes
Image credit: @babygypsyeyes

Due to Gunne Sax’s increased popularity, I have heard talk that there is a greater need to check for authenticity, as a number of popular brands took inspiration from Gunne Sax dresses. Samantha recommends joining the Facebook group for checking authenticity, as well as making sure to look for the all-important Gunne Sax label. She also suggests looking on Pinterest before purchasing to check the dress exists: “Every dress I have tried to look up has been on Pinterest I swear”.

The one problem I personally have with recommending Gunne Sax is of course the sizing, as it’s not size friendly. Samantha definitely agreeds and said, “size seems to be the Gunne Sax downfall”. She suggested getting a vintage Gunne Sax sewing pattern and tweaking it to fit and also has heard mention of people willing to custom make Gunne Sax copies!

Lastly, I had to ask what her favourite ‘Gunnes’ are and she gave the perfect answer: “I love the folkloric, autumnal, rich colors.  I want to feel like a 1970’s babe living her authentic prairie lifestyle….but I know that’s not how everyone feels.” Well, I’m not going to lie that’s how I want my autumn to be!

You can find Samantha on Instagram as @babygypsyeyes, be sure to check out her gorgeous Etsy shop if you now find yourself in desperate need of a Gunne Sax dress!

Image credit: @babygypsyeyes

Another of my favourite Gunne Sax sellers has to be AuburnFoxVintage on Etsy, who has posted some truly stunning Gunnes in her shop. For her, Gunne Sax is all about the: “Eternal romance. Wearing a Gunne Sax dress is like slipping into a fantasy. It’s pure femininity!”. I definitely understand what she means, the materials and the way the dresses are constructed alone, definitely harks back to a different way of dressing.

“These women that buy Gunne Sax dresses want to escape into a romantic world and not look like anyone else. These dresses, skirts and blouses let us slip back into time, when things were simpler.”

Karen at AuburnFoxVintage
One of Karens favourite Gunne Sax dresses that she owns. Image credit: Karen at AuburnFoxVintage

She did have some good news about fakes though, as she personally has never come across any and some possible positive sizing news. She says Gunne Sax dresses can go up to a size 15 (I’d suspect this would be about a 33 inch waist so a 14, small 16 in UK sizes) , however, she has never personally got her hands on any size larger than a size 13. Karen wasn’t familiar with any designers that have reproduced the Gunne Sax style, but did mention that there are seamstresses who can make dresses in the Gunne Sax style for you. She also highlighted Modcloth, for having a great range of sizes and a “vintage inspired” section.

One of Karens favourite Gunne Sax dresses that she owns – she said it made her feel like Maeve from Westworld! Image credit: Karen at AuburnFoxVintage

Be sure to check out Karen’s Etsy shop, AuburnFoxVintage , she has some of my all-time favourites Gunne Sax dresses in her shop as well as other gorgeous vintage dresses.

“Nothing makes me happier, than when these Gunne Goddesses receive their dresses and tell me how happy they are. Those dresses are fairytales, and we all want a happy ending.”

Karen at AuburnFoxVintage

I’ve mentioned Worthless Vintage on my blog before and Cat Stones who runs the shop was nice enough to talk to me about all things Gunne Sax, as I noticed she was a fan and had sold a few herself!

Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage

“I love that they’re all unique but they’re also part of a brand, it makes for a community of brand lovers who all trade between each other and is so loving and appreciative! I personally love the whole 70s aesthetic, and I love maxi dresses as I’m the perfect height for them and they’re so flattering – they make me feel amazing!”

Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage
Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage
Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage

For Cat, the appeal of Gunne is simply that they are characteristic of the 1970s in such a special way. The sheer range of the brand was something that also stood out (and I can certainly see why this is brought up again and again!), “there’s literally a Gunne for every taste – mine personally are the bold prints, the browns and the velvets”.

Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage
Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage

Cat also had some words of wisdom in regards to possible fakes, she stressed to: “always check the label”, and to always, “check for any possible alternations as this can deteriorate the value”. She did however mention: “If there’s no label it’s not always a bad sign, but before buying you should always ask the seller for a picture of the label (if there isn’t one posted).”

Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage
Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage

“Most Gunnes have a gold fleur de lis label and have a specific size tag, but some variations include the 1969 specific black label, rare white label/ heart label and early on J.G. Saxe label!”

Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage
Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage
Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage
Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage

Cat gave some great recommendations for brands similar in style to Gunne Sax including Laura Ashley (I know that the 1980s designs definitely vary in size much more than Gunne Sax dresses, but the 1970s style tend to be on the smaller size), young Edwardian by Arpeja and Jody T.

“In vintage terms, it’s difficult as the sizes were so much smaller back then … In my experience plus size prairie vintage is mostly unbranded except Laura Ashley, you just have to be vigilant enough to have a dig!”

Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage
Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage

You can find Cat on her personal Instagram @catellystones and her shop Worthless Vintage @worthless.vintage.

Image credit: Cat Stones, Worthless Vintage

So to conclude I am newly obsessed and yet to properly start my collection though I have started a Gunne Sax wishlist with all my dream dresses on (if this is you, I’d definitely recommend joining the Facebook group because all the interactions I have seen on there have been lovely)!

Although, I am definitely feeling all the autumnal coloured dresses at the moment because I can feel the weather start to turn towards autumn here; I also have a soft spot for any of the peach dresses and any with a peplum or hood! However, the beauty of Gunne Sax is that there is a style to suit every taste, I’ve even seen some fabulous Gothic ones!

I leave you with the comment that I am still new to this fabulous brand so if I have left anything out or written anything incorrectly, please let me know!

April (April is the Cruellest Month)

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Buying more ethically and sustainably: my journey to cut down on high street fashion

Hi everyone! So if you’re new here I thought I better start this post of by explaining that recently (the last few months) I’ve really been trying hard to be more conscious with my fashion choices, with the aim of transitioning to buying almost exclusively second hand, vintage or ethical and sustainable clothing.

Since I’ve been a lover of vintage fashion from a young age this always felt like an achievable aim for me as I already knew my way around buying vintage clothing, as well as sourcing second hand clothing in general. I’ve even wrote a handy guide, which I’d recommend reading if you’re new to vintage or buying secondhand clothing online.

However, I also love new trends in fashion and unique and independent designers so I knew resisting the high street would be hard for me. Especially, since some of my favourite memories with friends have been shopping with them.

And that’s why I wanted to come on here and be honest about the struggles and slip-ups I’ve had, not only to try and re-commit myself but also to highlight that you don’t need to be perfect (and trust me I feel the pressure to get it 100% right).

Also, I may also want to get out a confession that I just bought a pair of new espadrilles because although I had tried looking for them second hand and for vintage ones I hadn’t found any as perfect. They were also that dreaded thing shops do to sucker you in … on sale.

So I caved and I bought them but only because I had wanted them for a long time (months, hence why they were on sale) and with a promise that I would wear them and could envision at least 5 different outfits (that I already owned) that they would go with. And I guess that is the message I’d like to spread, instead of making yourself feel guilty, make the most of your purchase (and make the most of your old high street purchases too).

Dress: Charity shop (from Monsoon originally)

Shoes: Warehouse x Shrimps

It’s not always possible due to different circumstances to buy new and as ethically as you possibly can (money, time and convenience are all valid factors) but try to reduce these events as much as possible. And when they do happen, make sure you wear the item till death (and then repair when possible). Digital Writer for Elle and vintage Instagram seller, Daisy Murray wrote a great Instagram post about how she thinks strategic high street buys can be still be a part of slow fashion, which I would seriously suggest checking out.

And if buying a particular item turns out to be a mistake and you can’t return it, sell it on Depop or on Ebay (donating to charity shops is also a good alternative for good quality items but a lot of items donated are sent overseas, so where possible try donating to friends as a better alternative instead). As much as I really try to consider my purchases now, I still make mistakes (especially with online vintage where you can’t try a piece on beforehand) and I really want to ensure I get better at making sure such pieces are being worn and loved so expect to see those pieces hit my Depop (@aprilrain3) shop more often.

Another example of something I bought new in the last few months is trousers for a job. I honestly tried looking for them on Ebay, Depop and charity shops (and succeeded at first because I thought I needed black trousers, turns out I needed a different colour) but was unsuccessful. So I got some on Asos instead because I’ll be honest it was convenient and both pairs were part of their eco-edit (to cut a long story short I got two different pairs of trousers because in the UK khaki means green but in the US it means beige, so when I saw khaki/ beige I thought I could mix it up a bit at work and have both but they just meant beige only, ha, ha) and they had a petite leg so I didn’t need to alter them.

Luckily, in this scenario I was able to donate the trousers I got to colleagues who needed them for work (and in the spirit of a full disclosure, I also got some back up pairs from other high street stores, when I realised I only had one pair of work trousers, which I also donated). I did not however donate the khaki pair (the pre mentioned green pair) but I found some ways to rock them with items I already owned and if I ever don’t have a place for them in my wardrobe anymore I will sell them (at the point I realised the error it was too late to return them).

Maison cleo blouse

Top: Maison Cleo

Trousers: Asos (Eco-edit)

Shoes: H & M

I also bought a few items while I was in China because honestly I didn’t realise how hot it was going to be and I was suffering so I bought some espadrille trainers (yes, I know I have a problem) which I wear all the time and love from H & M. Unfortunately, all the items I bought were from fast fashion sources because there were no vintage or second shops available where I was staying. However, all the items I did get are all items I see myself keeping for a long time but this is not something I want to repeat in the future and I know deep down that I did take advantage of the fact that I didn’t have other options a little bit to justify the items I did get.

On my blog, going forward if I’m wearing the item I will mention where they are from and link back to this post for explanation. Other than that if you see items that are from fast fashion brands it will say ‘old’ or ‘secondhand’ in brackets because it will be items I already own or purchased secondhand. On Instagram, I currently only tag brands that I like the ethics of and will explain the origins of any pieces I am wearing if asked.

Shirt: Stolen from Martin

Tank top: (old)

Trousers: No Me (bought in China)

Belt: Charity shop

Shoes: Vegan Dr Martens

Looking forward

Now I’ve got all my confessions out of the way I thought I better set out my path going forward and also just reiterate that I don’t feel guilty about fast fashion purchases I have bought in the past and love (I’ve got pieces I literally wear almost every day) and I am trying not to feel guilty for tripping up (as that will just make me want to give up completely). It’s going to be hard, and it can definitely be difficult on a budget, which is why in the future I definitely want to focus on some budget-friendly sustainable and ethical clothing posts, as well as trickier items (work out clothes and swimsuits for one).

As I’ve mentioned in this post, clothes shopping with a friends can be a challenge if you are trying not to buy new. Luckily, my friends let me drag them along to vintage shops and I also feel comfortable still going to high street stores with them. I’d rather help them to make a decision and buy a piece they really like and I generally try not to impose my beliefs on others (as I find people are more likely to want to talk to you about something if it’s just a fact about you rather than something you’re constantly preaching about).

So instead of not talking about the difficulties I’m going to embrace them and rant about them on here (sorry about that) but also start exploring helpful topics, such as how to make the most of your clothes (such as how to get your clothes altered/ how to repair and wash clothes).

My commitment then is to transparency, even if I make mistakes. I’m going to start small and aim for nothing ‘new’/ obtained from an unsustainable source for a month but that doesn’t mean you probably won’t be hearing about my vintage clothing finds. Also, I’d like to mention something that clicked for me recently as a fashion lover/ collector, trying to be more sustainable doesn’t necessarily mean you have to have a tiny wardrobe, you just need to have more thought about what goes into it.

Denim vest: Charity shop

Skirt: Charity shop

Shoes: Shrimps x Warehouse

Dress: Vintage from Depop

Shoes: Shrimps x Warehouse

April (April is the Cruellest Month)

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My guide to buying secondhand/ vintage

When I was posting a photo on my Instagram recently, I realised I still hadn’t written a post on how I approach buying secondhand/ vintage, which I thought might be useful for those less obsessive to searching for secondhand treasures than I am.

While this will be a general guide focusing on women’s fashion (which you know does not have to just be for women – wear what you want!), as that is generally the area I tend to focus on; I will try to make this post as inclusive to different sizes as much as possible. I also think a lot of the points in this post are relevant for most people!

In regards to being inclusive to different sizes, I am generally going to focus on plus sized fashion as a point in this post. Although, finding good fitting clothes at any size is difficult, it can feel especially intimidating buying vintage as someone plus sized as the general rhetoric is that everyone was smaller in the past (which was not always the case). It’s for the reason I’ve pulled together some specific tips for plus sized vintage lovers.

But first some general tips.

Know your measurements – you don’t need to know the distance from your elbow to your wrist but generally knowing your bust, waist and hips measurement is useful. Leg length can be useful as well, which you should have encountered jean shopping before, especially if you are part of my petite brethren who need a 28inch leg or smaller.

I tend to focus on my waist measurement when looking for clothes as I tend to go for a silhouette that is looser everyone else but there. I think knowing these measurements are especially important on sites like Ebay for example, as some people may classify what they regard as a size 10 for example different to you, and can lead to things either fitting you when you might have disregarded them or an ill fitting purchase.

If you don’t have a tape measure handy, a general rule is that a size 6 is a 24/ 25 inch waist, size 8 a 26 inch waist, size 10 a 28 inch waist, size 12 a 30 inch waist, size 14 a 32 inch waist, and it carries on as such in 2 inch increments. However, not everyone will fit this blueprint – everyone’s body is different!

Another top tip is to measure a piece of clothing you think fits you very well and use that as a guide.

Tops tips for plus sized women – if you’re looking for vintage fashion, the 80s and 90s is great for plus sized women and when I look for clothes in that decade, I often see larger sizes represented. However, that does not mean you should discount other decades, as although rarer, there are pieces in other decades such as the 50s and 60s that will work (especially if you know your measurements!), you just have to dig a little more.

Charity shops tend to be more size inclusive because they rely on donations and they are definitely on of the places I have seen the largest size selection.

If you’re a size that is not well represented, looking for your favourite brands on Ebay is a good start, I know that Killstar (if you’re into a gothic look) caters for a variety of sizes and Lazy Oaf because of some of their cuts can work for plus sized women (though beware of price bump ups for some pieces as their larger sizes usually sell out fast).

I’d also check out vintage fashion bloggers who are plus sized, as although, I’ve included this information based on what I’ve personally seen, I’m not plus sized and someone who is will be able to advise much better than me.

The blogger Vintage Voluptuous has done some great posts on vintage fashion and has even done vintage plus size Etsy roundups. Her blog is so easy to follow and all her outfits are flawless – she’s definitely worth checking out.

Another great blog I found when researching this piece was Something Definitely Happened who crafts some ‘Practically Perfect’ looks (you’ll get it when you see her Mary Poppins look).

Although, both these blogs aren’t exclusively focused on vintage but reproduction items as well; they are great not only in terms of inspiration and creativity but also if you like a brand that they mention that caters to your size, you can look out for them on Ebay and Depop!

I wasn’t able to find any plus sized bloggers who focus on sustainable fashion (doesn’t mean they don’t exist – google can only do so much!), however I did find a list of sustainable fashion companies that cater to plus sized women, as well as ethical brands, as I have noticed that ethical and sustainable companies usually tend to have a limited sizing run.

Ebay

My first Ebay tip is to set up buying alerts for the items you are looking for. It saves you trawling the site every week and hopefully will guarantee you first dibs on the item. I really wish Depop had this feature (please correct me if I’m wrong about that but as far as I see it does not). I currently have two alerts set up for a rare pair of Irregular Choice (Petal Fever – in green of course – there’s currently a blue pair up in my size but I want the green!) and a vintage pair of Dr Martens.

The second tip involves knowing where to begin if you are not looking for a particular item but want to be inspired (/ replicate that ‘looking through a website for clothes’ feeling). My tip here is to look for brands that you usually like a lot of the pieces for, for example I generally like a lot of the items in Urban Outfitters and Zara but I am not willing to pay their prices (especially Urban Outfitters) and would rather buy second hand and help the planet out. I would even suggest looking for pieces you’ve seen in store (this is especially useful if you’ve tried the piece on in store and know your size) and searching for the piece (this is a useful tip for platforms like Depop too). I’ve found this is a really great way to get something new and stop the culture of a piece sitting in someone else’s wardrobe who’s bought it and changed their mind.

Ebay can also be great for some vintage fashion details but make sure you carefully read the description as you won’t get the opportunity to try it on like a vintage shop. A lot of the times, items may need some DIY, which can be difficult to judge whether it’s a big job or not without seeing the item so be careful unless you are a master seamstress.

However, I’ve found some lovely vintage 90s gems on Ebay in great condition, as well as some great pieces from Urban Outfitters and Zara.

Dodie Human 7

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1st image: Dungarees originally from Zara. Bought on Ebay. 

2nd image: Dress originally from Urban Outfitters. Bought on Ebay. 

Depop

Although, I love Depop, I’d also like to start with a word of caution as it isn’t for everyone.   Depop can be more tricky as both a buyer and seller, as it can be harder to communicate (you are not allowed to send images as a private message, which I understand is useful to stop harassment but can be frustrating). I’ve also had issues with sellers not sending me an item, though I successfully got my money back through a Paypal claim but it wasn’t a short process. As a seller, it can be frustrating when you receive what I would describe as incredibly cheeky offers for items to the point where you’d be losing money selling the item to someone.

My advice to combat this is as a buyer always check feedback, make sensible offers and always read a seller’s profile details. As a seller, one thing that helped me is don’t feel like you have to respond to low offers. Also, buyers please be polite in your messages, sending ‘lowest?’ with nothing else does not make me inclined to want to offer you a good deal.

I have got some great deals on Depop though from my vegan Dr Martens to my Lucy and Yak dungarees (though I keep missing the denim dungarees when they come up on their Depop – I think I’m cursed!).

There are though some great sellers on Depop who source some truly stunning vintage pieces. My favourites are Worthless Vintage (where I got the trousers seen below and the necklace in the picture above), sisters Mathilda Mai and Liberty Mai (who now have a website called MaiBee) and Earth Nadia. People with Instagram followings also tend to sell their items on there so if there is a fashion blogger you like, it’s definitely worth checking out if they have a Depop – one of my favourites is Babyricecake.

If you like a seller’s style, it’s also worth checking out their likes on their profile for more sellers who probably have a similar style to follow.

I think Depop can also be a great place to source items from America if you’re from the UK while avoiding custom fees, etc.

In regards to searching for items, Depop can be a scary place to begin if you’re not looking for specific items. I would suggest looking up what Depop sellers are popular and following ones that suit your personal style, as well as like my advice with Ebay looking for brands you particular like – this is especially useful for more niche brands like Lazy Oaf and Killstar, as people who sell those items in my experience tend to sell lots of similar items from the same brand and others.

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1st and 2nd image: Trousers from Worthless Vintage on Depop!

Vintage

For me, modern day vintage shops can be divided into two types. The more trendy, usually 80s and 90s focused (though fashion from other decades can be present), often reworked vintage shops and the classic shops, which focus on pristine pieces, usually from the 1970s and earlier. Of course there are shops that mesh between these two types but for me broadly most vintage shops are either one or other. The newer shops tend to fit the first category.

The reason these categories are important is because depending what vintage style you are after will depend what shop you want to go to. If you are interested in a fairly authentic vintage look and bespoke pieces, the second option is probably your best bet, but if you’re interested in blending in vintage pieces with modern pieces the first type is probably what you’d prefer.

Due to the fact that the first type of shop tends to have more recent or reworked pieces, they tend to have a larger size selection (this is also because they tend to have a larger amount of stock).

There’s not much advice I can give about shopping in brick and mortar vintage shops as they will be dependent on your area, except for know your measurements and bring a tape measure handy (this is especially useful if you struggle to estimate the size of clothing). This also helps if you have to take a gamble because the vintage shop doesn’t have a changing room (rare but it does happen) or you don’t feel comfortable trying it on and want to wing it (it depends where you go but sometimes the changing rooms can be a bit makeshift).

The best places I’ve been to for vintage shopping (both in vintage shops and the charity shops there) have been Nottingham and Sheffield. I do of course love London, especially Brick Lane but it tends to be more expensive. If you are ever in St Albans I’d recommend Little Viking Vintage, who I’ve wrote about before. You can also check out their Etsy, which often lists the crème de la crème of their stock.

Brick and mortar shops can sometimes be more expensive than online (it really depends)  but you do have the added bonus of the option of avoiding guessing whether something is going to fit/ suit you.

Another thing to pay attention for if you’re not as well versed in vintage is that some vintage shops also sell vintage style clothing, which is often sourced from fast fashion sources. The Ethical Unicorn has a great post on what to look out for here.

Dodie black dress

1st image: Vintage Pendleton coat from House of Vintage.

Charity shops

A lot of people are cautious of charity shops. I get it, they can be overwhelming and often filled with things that most people wouldn’t be interested in. However, they are definitely worth a look whether you’re interested in a vintage or modern look – I’ve seen plenty of dresses from Asos and Pretty Little Thing fill charity shop rails nowadays (especially as people are more conscious about where their unused clothing goes to).

When I’m in charity shops I tend to hunt for vintage and I’ve definitely found some gems from a beautiful green velvet blouse from Marks and Spencer’s old St Michaels range to numerous Laura Ashley dresses.

That does not mean though that I don’t sometimes have no idea where to start. The way I’ve combatted this is either through going in with a particular goal in mind, i.e. I’m looking for a pink coat or starting by just focusing on each individual section – I tend to always go straight to dresses.

A lot of charity shops have also clued into the fact that there’s been a switch around of opinion on charity shops and have seriously upgraded how they present items (so much that a charity shop I know in Lincoln even has a waitlist for items that appear on its mannequin) and will often have a ‘vintage’ section (this is usually a mixture of actual vintage clothing and clothing with a vintage twist – i.e. rockabilly dresses). This has meant though that the prices in charity shops have increased and I’ve witnessed many a item priced high enough to no longer be called a bargain, however, 90% of the time items you will find will be much cheaper than the standard high street fair (apart from maybe stores like Primark).

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1st images: Vintage St Michaels by Marks and Spencer blouse, bought from a charity shop.

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2nd image: Vintage Harley Davidson motorcycle boots and Topshop dress, both bought from a charity shop.

DIY

You’re out vintage shopping or you’re browsing in the charity shop and you spot the perfect item but then you find it has a small hole and the zip is broken. What do you do? Well, if you have sewing know how the answer is probably simple but for those of us who are uninitiated or simply ridiculously bad at DIY, what do you do?

First, check the item’s price reflects the damage. If it doesn’t and you’re feeling brave, mention the issue to the shop manager, explaining that it will cost you to fix the issue. If you manage to successfully negotiate a price you’re happy with, I’d say go for it. Well, that of course depends on what the issue is. I recently encountered a dress that I LOVED but the zipper would not budge no matter how hard I tugged. I managed to get some money off the dress and have since took the dress to be fixed. In total, the dress cost me £6 (I think) discounted, £1.50 for the zip and £16 for a seamstress to fit the new dress. Overall, that brings the total to £23.50, which although might seem a bit steep at first, is about the price that a lot of people would spend on a dress for a night out.*

While, that was a success story*, I would say do not go for the repair if it is past your skill level or know how. I recently fell in love with a green, 1950s lace dress while vintage shopping but it had noticeable discolouration all down the dress. While the dress was priced accordingly, as it was a branded dress in good condition other than the discolouration, it was more than I was willing to pay for a faded dress that I didn’t know whether I would be able to fix.

Essentially, use what knowledge you have to determine whether something is worth a DIY. Remember simple dye jobs can be quite easy (washing machine dye is your friend) and can transform a item, as well as a simple cropping of a top, but stay within your skill level (and outsource when necessary) otherwise that item will just be sitting in your wardrobe!

*Update: Due to the zip issue I wasn’t able to properly try the dress on and it fits on the waist but is way too tight on the hips – you win some, you lose some!

Etsy

I have a confession. I have not bought any clothing from Etsy in a long time. I tend to use Etsy to buy items from independent artists, however there are some stunning vintage shops on there as well and I do have a few favourites I love to follow.

If you’re a 50s/ 60s queen I’d check out Sartorial Matters‘ shop – the pieces are usually very Chuck’s style in Pushing Daisies!

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Another seller who sells on Etsy who is great for that vibe is Sweet Bee Finds, though my favourite of their pieces tends to be sold on their Instagram.

For sweet vintage pieces (that are usually Laura Ashley!) I’d recommend Duel at Dawn who also sells lots of adorable brooches.

For quirky accessories but also occasionally cute, alternative vintage pieces I’d recommend checking out KawaiiKave.

My top tip for Etsy is to make sure to set your shipping destination when searching, if you’d like to avoid costly international shipping costs.

Final thoughts

My general rule is I try to only buy new if I’ve exhausted looking for the item on the above list. I have slipped up on this a few times but compared to my spending habits before it’s a complete turn around. I will admit I was concerned about writing fashion posts where people couldn’t easily get the items if they liked it but the response I have had has been great!

I’d also suggest if you do need to buy something new and can afford it looking to companies that provide a living wage to their workers. Some of my favourites include Lucy and Yak and I love the ethos and transparency of Maison Cléo – if you’d like a future blog post on that, let me know!

April (April is the Cruellest Month)

Facebook: @aprilisthecruellestmonthblog

Instagram: @aprilisthecruellestmonth

Twitter: @aprilcruelmonth

This post is entirely my own opinion.  

I’m on a journey to make my wardrobe more ethical and sustainable (luckily a lot of what I buy is vintage which helps) but I’m not all the way there yet so the clothes I mention will reflect this. 

Ethical clothing: Lucy and Yak review

I’ve been a big fan of Lucy and Yak for a while now and I have actually talked about their dungarees that I got discounted on their Depop in a previous blog post (any samples/ items with a slight fault go on their Depop; it’s definitely a great place for some bargains). In fact, after doing some digging on their website I actually found out that Lucy and Yak started their company on Depop first before they got their website!

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For those who aren’t familiar with the brand, Lucy and Yak describe themselves as an ethical company, which to them means that their employees and manufacturers receive a fair, living wage. The company is also working towards being sustainable and have started off with their packaging. When you receive their dungarees they come in a super stylish material bag, which is actually all recycled material and their mailing bags are 100% biodegradable. They kindly link to the website they buy their mailing bags from on their website (which, I’ve just linked to) and from what I can see these bags should be able to decompose in industrial compost deposits (i.e. if you live in a UK and have a compost/ garden waste bin from my knowledge of this subject they should be able to go in that bin). They are hoping to be 100% plastic free in the future.

Lucy and Yak clothing is made in North India and on their website they highlight how their tailors are paid four times the state’s minimum wage. The living wage for India according to the not for profit Labour Behind the Label is 18,727 rupees a month (this figure is from 2015 however so it might be slightly out of date).

The link Lucy and Yak provide to map their employees wages against is in line with the current rate for the minimum wage in Rajasthan, India. I couldn’t find a living wage specifically for Rajasthan, however, I did find a chart that showed that minimum wage in 2018 was 4,162 rupees a month but the living wage varied from 7,170 rupees for a single adult to up to 19,700 rupees for a large family.

For an unskilled worker in the garment industry in which the minimum wage is 5,538 rupees a month their Lucy and Yak wage would then be 22,152 rupees. Lucy and Yak emphasise on their website however that their workers are highly skilled so I would assume they are earning more than this.

The figure I gave though is the absolute minimum their workers could earn and is more than the living wage for the country according to all the statistics I could find.

The company also stress on their website that in their tailor, Ismail’s factory, some of the tailors ‘live comfortably working part-time”. They also highlight how they were able to help build a brand new factory that is more spacious, clean and with air conditioning.

I am aware at this point that this post probably sounds sponsored but I can assure you it is not. I just really love the time and effort that goes into this company, especially in their pages on their website (it’s refreshing for these pages to actually be helpful and transparent) and I know personally I will be buying for them again in the future. I honestly went a lot more in detail about what actually goes on behind a brand in this post than I ever have done and I was pleased with what I found (hopefully I will have this same result with brands I review in the future).

However, without further ado let’s discuss what I got. I’ve wanted this coat for a while and initially couldn’t decide whether to pick it up in pink or brown, but after deciding via Instagram poll, I decided to go with the rose pink. This coat was £60, which is cheaper  price than I have seen from other ethical companies on average and I have seen similar coats priced at that amount in for example Topshop. Places like Primark and New Look however are likely to be a fair bit cheaper.

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What really sold me on this jacket apart from my desire to be a pink fluffy sheep is that it is made out of 100% recycled bottles. I don’t know about you but to me that was such a cool concept; the idea that you could wear a jacket made out of bottles.

Environmentally, there are advantages and disadvantages of using recycled polyester, which Lucy and Yak detail on their blog. Essentially it allows items like plastic bottles to be reused and repurposed, however, it doesn’t stop the problem of what happens to the item in the end. Also, every time you wash an item made of polyester it sheds microfibres that make their way into the ocean. This reason is why Lucy and Yak thought outwear would be a better use for this material, as generally coats needs to be washed less often. They also highlight a company that sell a bag which catches the microfibres released in the wash. It doesn’t solve the problem of what to do with the fibres afterwards but it is definitely a potentially helpful solution (I for one will definitely look into buying one when I need to wash the coat).

The jacket itself is super cosy; it has no lining which means it’s more of a lighter jacket than a full on winter coat but that also makes it feel like a blanket. It came in a beautiful fabric bag, which I’m obsessed with. I also love how it’s pink to match the coat!

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The rose pink of the coat is absolutely perfect and stunning in person. Overall, this is definitely a great autumn jacket and I think layered with other light jackets or cardigans underneath would work for the cold as well. It fits oversized so that means you can definitely fit a cardigan or light denim jacket under there. However, it’s not too oversized if you get what I mean.

Sizing wise I would say this coat fits true to size for an oversized (but not too oversized fit). If you’re at the top end of the size you’re looking to buy I’d probably advise sizing up if you’re really after that oversized look.

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Beret: Gift from a friend 

Jacket: Lucy and Yak 

Top: Olive Clothing 

Trousers: Topshop 

Shoes: Vegan Dr Martens 

Packaging wise, as mentioned before it came in recyclable plastic wrapping, then a fabric bag and then more plastic wrapping (I think this may be in case the coat sheds but I’m not entirely sure why it was there). However, when I looked this was biodegradable as well.

I do though have some problems with this coat that I wanted to talk about as well. For one, the coat sheds quite a bit and since it’s shedding plastic I don’t feel good shedding down the street (this has calmed down the longer I’ve had it though). Also, as mentioned although the lack of lining makes the jacket cosy; I think with a lining it could work better for colder temperatures and it would stop some of the jacket shedding on your clothes when you first wear it. I’ve been wearing this jacket non stop for a week or two now to really test it out and in that process one of the buttons has fallen off. I’d understand if it’d been a few months of heavy use/ to a year but for a week, I think the buttons may need to be secured better.

Overall, this is a super cosy jacket (in a really unique rose pink) and I really like the innovative nature of how it’s made. If this is a better sustainable option, I’m not sure just yet but it is a ethical one from a brand I really admire. I think a few tweaks to the design would make it absolutely perfect!

I hope you enjoyed this post. If you’d be interested in a review of other Lucy and Yak styles in the future (I’ve definitely been eyeing some more of their dungarees) or maybe even an interview with the company about their brand (I think this definitely would be really interesting) then let me know in the comments!

April (April is the Cruellest Month)

YouTube: @aprilisthecruellestmonth

Facebook: @aprilisthecruellestmonthblog

Instagram: @aprilisthecruellestmonth

Twitter: @aprilcruelmonth

This post is entirely my own opinion. The jacket was purchased with my own money along with the clothing mentioned in this post. 

Any brands in the background of my photographs are entirely coincidental (the only time I had to take photographs was in London with my friend on Oxford Street). I understand the irony of having a very capitalist background to a ethical/ sustainable fashion post but hey, that’s the world we live in! 

I’m on a journey to make my wardrobe more ethical and sustainable (luckily a lot of what I buy is vintage which helps) but I’m not all the way there yet so the clothes I mention will reflect this.