Eco-friendly organic cotton socks: Kind Socks review

I’m always on the lookout for eco-friendly and sustainable underwear or hosiery, as let’s face it that’s one item you don’t really want to buy secondhand! So when the company Kind Socks got in contact and offered to send me some socks, I jumped at the chance, especially after looking at their website and seeing all their funky socks (I’ve always been partial to a bright sock). However, while these socks were gifted, I was not paid for this post and all thoughts and opinions are all my own!

So first of all I’ll start with the socks themselves, my first impression was that they were super comfortable and I could immediately tell they were good quality and going to last. I love that they are cotton because cotton socks have always been my favourite because cotton is naturally a good, breathable fabric. On the back of the socks there is a care label but I’m useless at deciphering the symbols so all I could gather is do not iron them!

After some googling I ascertained that the care instructions include (I’ll include the images below in case I got any wrong):

  • The socks can be washed on a synthetic wash.
  • Don’t use chlorine bleach when washing these socks.
  • Use a delicate/ gentle tumble dry.
  • Don’t iron these socks.
  • You can use any solvent on these socks except Trichloroethylene .

For the best instructions however I’d follow the advice given on the Kind Socks website, which suggests to not wash their socks higher than 40 degrees (celsius) and to avoid bleaching/ ironing your socks.

While these socks do not come in a million different designs (at least not yet), the designs that are available are funky, fun and vibrant and I like that all the socks are unisex. Expense wise, the socks are not cheap (at £10 a pair) but not ridiculously expensive either and personally these would be my snazzy, bright socks that I’d get out when I wanted to make a statement and not necessarily the socks I’d wear every day (though you totally could if you wanted to).

Turtleneck: From the charity shop (thrifted)

Necklace: Vintage (present*)

Dungarees: Lucy and Yak

Socks: Kind Socks

Backpack: Fjallraven Kanken (present)

Shoes: Vegan Dr Martens (second hand)

The socks I received. For reference I am shoe size 37.5 and were plenty of room on me.

On the manufacturing side of things the socks at Kind Socks are all made out 100% GOTS Organic Cotton (you can read more about the benefits of organic cotton on the environment here and more about cotton production here but essentially organic cotton is cotton grown without the use of synthetic agricultural chemicals such as pesticides and fertilisers, which can harm beneficial insects in the eco-system and affect biodiversity.

For those of you who are new to who GOTS are (as I was), it stands for the Global Organic Textile Standard, who are, “recognised as the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibres”. They, “defin[e] high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well”. Essentially, if a product is GOTS approved, it has to have checked off a range of high-level environmental and social criteria (i.e. the contribution the product makes to the environment and the working conditions involved).

Kind Socks are made in India by a GOTS certified supplier selected from their Global Organic Textile Standard database. From email correspondence with the owner of Kind Socks, I learnt that the factory Kind Socks are made in is called B.R Knitwears Pvt.Ltd and they are based in New Dehli. To be GOTS certified, Stephen (the owner of Kind Socks) told me you have to adhere to the below list:

1. Fibre Production
Organic certification of fibres on the basis of recognised international or national standards.

2. Processing and Manufacturing
At all stages, through the processing, organic fibre products must be separated from conventional fibre products and must be clearly identified. Also, bleaches must be based on oxygen (no chlorine bleaching).

3. Supply Chain
Operators from post-harvest handling up to garment making and traders have to undergo an onsite annual inspection cycle and must hold a valid GOTS scope certificate applicable for the production/trade of the textiles to be certified.

4. Label Grades 
≥ 95% certified organic fibres, ≤ 5 % non-organic natural or synthetic fibres

However, when I looked the company up on the database it said that their certificate is not currently valid so I got in touch with Kind Socks and they explained that B.R Knitwears are being currently being reviewed, as all manufacturers are audited yearly and their certificate should be renewed soon.

The compostable packaging my parcel came in (only unnecessary piece of packaging was perhaps the tissue paper inside the socks though there may be a reason for this I don’t know)!

In regards to the people behind the making of the socks, on their website, Kind Socks, describe themselves as Fairtrade and state that this means that the, “people who make them actually gets a fair earning wage”, which is good but I would like a bit more information about this and the factory the socks are made in. So I asked! Kind Socks explained that to be GOTS certified, workers involved in the production have to be paid the actual cost of living not just the national minimum wage and adhere to other important standards, such as not working an excessive amount of hours.

So all in all, Kind Socks definitely live up to their name. Kind to the environment, the people working in the industry and to my feet – genuinely, they just feel really nice on my feet (which, feels such a weird thing to say). I can’t wait to see what fun designs they bring out next!

April (April is the Cruellest Month)

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*present refers to a gift I have received from family/ friends. All items that have been sent by PR will be referred to as gifted.

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